Lol @ This ‘Tiny Toilet’ That Looks Like a Painted Lady Stopping Traffic on the Bay Bridge

It was, in fact, not a tiny house, after all

Matt Charnock

--

Photo: Courtesy of Getty Images via bluejayphoto

Yesterday, July 20th, a strange scene played out on the Bay Bridge: a tiny house became detached from its trailer hitch, stopping traffic on the far left lane of the bridge between San Francisco and Treasure Island.

It was an iPhone-unholstering sight to begin with — seeing a tiny house, which has grown in popularity since the early 2010s — but a closer look at it revealed the diminutive structure was constructed to look like one of San Francisco’s famous Painted Ladies. That’s just fucking wild.

KCBS Radio was first to report on the odd scene, waxing on the fact that “there [was] a tiny house that fell off a trailer” yesterday afternoon, leaving the traffic to just a crawl through “#SanFrancisco on northbound 101 and eastbound 80.”

(At first glance, I immediately thought the tiny home was perhaps en route to Northern California’s only [legal)] tiny-home community — Delta Bay. At the 12-acre RV park and tiny-house resort, nestled on the banks of the San Joaquin River about 40 minutes outside Stockton, the first homes on wheels started rolling in just seven years ago. Logic dictated said the now-damaged tiny house was perhaps en route to the area.)

But on closer research… what caused a massive traffic jam on the Bay Bridge yesterday wasn’t actually a tiny house. It was a mobile public toilet from San Francisco Public works; it was designed to be a “one-of-a-kind homage to the world-famous Painted Ladies.”

Part of Pit Stop — a San Francisco initiative to offer a safe and clean place to use the “restroom, dispose of needles and collect dog waste bags” — there are 33 hygiene locations around SF organized by the City program. Collectively, about half of those units are located in either the Mission District of The Castro; most Pit Stop locations operate between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., though a handful of them are listed as being open 24hrs, according to San Francisco Public Works.

What the mobile sanitation station was doing crossing the Bay Bridge remains unclear. Nevertheless, we do love any reason to harp on tiny living and the polarizing structures the lifestyle is synonymous with.

--

--

Matt Charnock

SF transplant, coffee shop frequent; tiny living enthusiast. iPhone hasn’t been off silent mode in nine or so years. Former EIC of The Bold Italic.